Monthly Archives: March 2019

Dental Stem Cells and Tooth Regeneration In 2019

Teeth are the foremost natural, noninvasive source of stem cells. Dental stem cells, that are straightforward, convenient, and reasonable to gather, hold promise for a variety of very potential therapeutic applications. Dental stem cells provide an awfully promising therapeutic approach to restoring structural defects and this idea is extensively explored by many researchers that are obvious by the speedily growing literature in this field.

Dental problems caused by dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury compromise the oral and general health issues. Current advances in the development of regenerative therapy have been influenced by our understanding ofembryonic development, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering technologyTooth regeneration is a field of regenerative medicine procedure within the field of tissue engineering and stem cell biology to exchange damaged or lost teeth by re-growing them from autologous stem cells.

Dental stem cells and cell-activating cytokines are thought to be candidate approach for tooth tissue regeneration as results of they have the potential to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole tooth replacement therapy is taken into consideration to be an attractive idea for next generation regenerative therapy as a type of bioengineered organ replacement.Dental problems caused by dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury compromise the oral and general health issues. Current advances in the development of regenerative therapy have been influenced by our understanding of embryonic development, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering technology. Tooth regeneration is a field of regenerative medicine procedure within the field of tissue engineering and stem cell biology to exchange damaged or lost teeth by re-growing them from autologous stem cells.

Dental stem cells and cell-activating cytokines are thought to be candidate approach for tooth tissue regeneration as results of they have the potential to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole tooth replacement therapy is taken into consideration to be an attractive idea for next generation regenerative therapy as a type of bioengineered organ replacement.

  • Collection and Preservation of Dental Stem Cells
  • Regeneration of Functional Tooth
  • Dental Cell Banking
  • Dental Lamina
  • Regeneration of Fill Cavities

 

Source: https://tissuesciencecongress.conferenceseries.com/

 

How To Regenerate Tooth Enamel With Biopolymers

Researchers at Queen Mary University London have found a way to grow mineralized materials that can be used to regenerate hard tissue like dental enamel. The scientists have created a material that can be used as an artificial dental enamel to prevent and treat tooth decay or tooth sensitivity. To create the enamel, the scientists use a biopolymer to trigger and guide the growth of apatite nanocrystals, the main mineral found in dental enamel and bones.

The biopolymers, called elastin-like recombinamers, help organize apatite nanocrystals into microscopic prisms. Together they form larger macroscopic structures with the properties of dental enamel, such as stiffness, hardness and acid resistance. Thanks to the biopolymer, the nanocrystals can be grown as membranes or coatings over uneven surfaces, including organic tissue. The research team is now looking into developing applications for this material.

“The technology could benefit many people and [commercialization] is the ultimate goal of our work,” says Alvaro Mata, who led the research group.

Dental enamel is the hardest tissue in the body and protects our teeth from biting forces, acidic food and drink, and extreme temperatures over the course of our lifetime. Unlike other tissues, enamel cannot regenerate once it is lost, which causes pain and tooth loss. Replacing lost enamel is a major challenge in dentistry.

To address this challenge, the apatite nanocrystal technology may be combined with tissue regenerating and bioprinting technologies.

“It is certainly a possibility,” Mata elaborates. “The kinds of regenerative challenges that we are talking about will require collaboration between disciplines and integration of different technologies. We are very keen to collaborate with different people to make things happen.”

The UK seems to be a hotspot for research into tooth regeneration. At King’s College London, researchers performed experiments in mice that showed that an Alzheimer’s drug stimulated natural repair processes in stem cells found inside teeth to fill cavities.

Source: https://labiotech.eu/

Stem Cells for Dental Implants and Tooth Regrowth

When, and if, these two new treatments are successful on humans, they could end up totally replacing the dental composite and dental implants industries.

The new advancements don’t work from the perspective of replacing teeth that are damaged or fall out due to trauma, cavities, or gum disease. Instead, the stem cells are used to actually regenerate the teeth.

This is possible because stem cells can create any type of cell in the body. When the right stem cell is used along with the right growth factors to encourage stem cell growth, new tissues – such as a tooth – can become a reality.

70250391 – dentists tooth plastic model with screw implant for teaching, learning and patients in dental office showing teeth and gums.

New research shows that stem cells for dental implants and tooth regrowth are right around the corner and could provide painless ways of saving and restoring teeth.

The two advancements that were used in these initial studies were:

1. Low level laser therapy that activated the stem cells and created new teeth.

2. The creation of a 3-D scaffold with a collagen sponge upon which the stem cells and growth factors were added, and new teeth formed. Sometimes a drug is used to start the process.

Source: https://stemcellthemagazine.com/

How To Use Lasers To Regrow Teeth From Stem Cells

Imagine if a trip to the dentist to treat a cavity didn’t involve a filling, root canal, or crown. What if a simple light treatment could actually get your teeth to regrow themselves using stem cells? That’s the aim of a group of researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute, led by David Mooney, who have found success in regrowing rat teeth in this manner. The researchers have developed a technique using a low-power laser to coax stem cells into reforming dentin, which could have implications for dentistry, wound healing, and bone restoration. The results of the study have been published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Proteins known as growth factors are what cause stem cells to differentiate into whatever type of cell they are bound to become. Introducing different growth factors force the cells to develop the desired type of tissue. Unfortunately, it isn’t quite as simple as it sounds. Most of the developments in using stem cells in regenerative medicine have regrown tissues in vitro and later need to be transplanted into the person. This involves a lot of technical care and is a highly regulated process, which slows down progress. Mooney’s team claims they have come up with a new technique that could streamline the process, making it a viable clinical option much more quickly.

The team set up a miniature dentist office-like setting for the rodents used in the study. They drilled holes into the rats’ molars to simulate tooth decay. Next, adult stem cells were applied to the pulp of the tooth and a non-ionizing, low-level laser was used to stimulate the growth factors. The teeth were then sealed with a temporary cap to be worn over the next 12 weeks. The follow-up x-rays and microscopy analysis showed that the dentin, the layer under the visible enamel, had indeed begun to grow back due to the laser/stem cell therapy.

“Our treatment modality does not introduce anything new to the body, and lasers are routinely used in medicine and dentistry, so the barriers to clinical translation are low,” Mooney said in a press release. “It would be a substantial advance in the field if we can regenerate teeth rather than replace them.”

Source: https://www.iflscience.com/

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